Talk Title:
Learn to Tell a Story– Not What You’ve Done –IF You
Want to Build a Successful Career!

Focus:
Soft Skills

Book:
Critical Thinking Skills for DUMMIES

Presenter:
Martin Cohen

         

Think carefully about the career you choose!

Webinar Overview

Learn to Tell a Story– Not What You’ve Done –IF You Want to Build a Successful Career!

Just what are the ingredients of a great argument? What is the secret to communicating your ideas clearly and persuasively? And how do you see through sloppy thinking and flim-flam? If you’ve ever asked any of these questions, then you need to join Martins presentation.

Critical thinking skills are among the most desired and expected soft skill of hiring managers and bosses. What have you done to improve yours?

Martin is an expert at understanding other people’s assumptions, methodology, conclusions, evaluate evidence, and interpret text effectively and he will show you how to become one too!

Martin will give you a background on these fundamentals:

  • Tools and strategies for developing your reflective thinking skills
  • Guidance on sound reasoning and textual analysis
  • Critical thinking skills that will help you advance your career

You will also gain advice on when NOT to apply logic to rigidly. Join Martin to pick improve your critical thinking skills.

Presenter: Martin Cohen

Martin Cohen is an established author specializing in popular books in philosophy, social science and politics. Recent books include ‘Critical Thinking Skills for Dummies’ and a look at how scientists work called ‘Paradigm Shift’ – which sounds rather technical but is actually a great deckchair read, taking a look at many perplexed and perplexing issues in life, from religion to science, from food fads to black holes in space..

Speaking of food fads, Martin’s current project is a book on food (and philosophy too) with incredible insights into why everything we eat makes us fat, and has more to do with laboratories than farms.

That’s why we need those ‘Critical Thinking Skills’! His second ‘for Dummies’ book offers a no-holds-barred and amusing tour of thinking itself. (Where else will you find Frankenstein showing you how to construct good arguments?) and lots of interactive challenges and quizzes.

Other recent projects include the ‘How to Live’ books featuring ‘Wise (and not-so-wise) Advice from the Great Philosophers’. These examine a whole load of unexpected philosophical things like the virtues of cheese sandwiches (Rousseau) and making the wife work in a factory (John Locke).

However, Martin is best known for two introductions to philosophy, 101 Philosophy Problems and 101 Ethical Dilemmas. These, despite being originally aimed at the academic market, between them have sold over 250,000 copies and been translated into 20 different languages.

Other books include an “anti-history” of great philosophers, Philosophical Tales (2008); the UK edition of Philosophy for Dummies; Mind Games: 31 days to rediscover your Brain and The Doomsday Machine. A project developing resources for Philosophy for Children has led to two beautifully illustrated children’s books called Milo and the Upside-down Goggles and The Body-Exchange Machine (The project website is http.//www.philosophystories.co.uk)

Martin now writes full-time, but in the past has taught philosophy and social science at a number of universities in the UK and Australia and was involved in a research project at Leeds University under George MacDonald Ross exploring ways to shift philosophy teaching away from the mere study of philosophical facts and toward a view of philosophy as an activity.

An activist environmentalist, he wrote an influential series of articles in the Times Higher (London) about the politics of the climate change debate. He has written discussion papers on environmental concerns for the European Parliament and been invited by the Chinese government to discuss ecological rights and indigenous communities.

Martin is also the editor of THE PHILOSOPHER, a journal founded in 1923, which counts some of the best-known names in Twentieth-Century philosophy amongst its contributors. His editorial strategy is to allow as wide a range of ideas as possible a forum in the Journal, and this often print papers by non-specialists with unusual and original ideas. He is currently based in Aquitaine, France, but often travels to the US and UK.

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